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IKEA ÅNGUERA | Tiago do Vale Architects

Ever wonder how it would be like to buy a house and it came with instructions to do it yourself like Ikea? get a look in this project by Tiago do Vale Architects
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ÅNGUERA Poetic Simplicity

Text by the architects This is a project filled with singularities. A project that is as much about what is built as it is about its communication.

tiago do vale - Anguera Centraldesign magazine

In the interior of the Brazilian Northeast, it had to be particularly aware of the limited resources available locally (both in quantity and variety) but, fundamentally, its design and communication had to be adjusted to the characteristics of the local manpower.
Considering that perspectives are more effective in communicating architectural objects than plans we wondered -with some naive curiosity, good humor, but also a practical spirit- if a house construction could be explained with a universal IKEA-like communication strategy.
This idea of a project explained with the simple, basic language of an IKEA furniture manual became a project strategy: the representation of the project became the theme that gave the project its shape.

ÅNGUERA materials

In consequence, the operations that allow the transformation of this building had to be simple, almost simplistic. The constructive solutions had to be basic, easily controlled in their finish and executed with just a couple of steps. The complete construction had to be condensed to a sequence of simple and clear movements that could be explained in just a few pages.
Hence, the full construction is solved with a short palette of materials: cobogo, concrete blocks, cement, wire-mesh panels, MDF for the carpentries, glass for the openings.
The starting point is the plain demolition of everything non structural.
The new dividing walls are raised block over block, with no finish other than painting. Some wall panes are constituted by cobogo masonry, allowing for ventilation at strategic points of the structure.

Building manual

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